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OASIS®

Overview

A simple solution for complex wounds

A value-based, natural extracellular matrix to help meet the challenge of hard-to-heal wounds1

OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO products are naturally derived scaffolds of extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS)1 and indicated for the management of a wide range of acute and chronic wounds.

Similar composition to the human dermis2-13 providing pathways to cellular migration and vascular growth.14

 

Intended for versatility and affordability in routine clinical use.

 

24-month shelf life at room temperature (18-month shelf life for OASIS MICRO), terminally sterilized and not subject to tracking requirements of the Joint Commission.*


Shown to achieve greater effectiveness in the management of chronic leg ulcers15 and diabetic foot ulcers16, achieving improved epithelialization and wound closure compared to standard care alone.15,16 View more clinical evidence details.

Find out how OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO products work by visiting the ‘How OASIS works’ page

Choose your solution

OASIS MATRIX and OASIS MICRO products are available in a range of forms and sizes, depending on individual patient needs.

One-layer structure providing fenestrated, naturally derived ECM. This option offers the shortest time to complete integration.

Ideal for: supporting wound closure15,16 as part of standard care. Suitable for use with a variety of secondary dressings (applies to all OASIS Matrix products).17

Two-layer structure providing meshed/fenestrated layers of naturally derived ECM. The extra thickness allows easier fixation and retention of sutures and staples (if necessary).

Ideal for: use on second-degree burn wounds, providing additional thickness. Not suitable for use on third-degree burns.

Three-layer structure providing meshed/fenestrated layers of naturally derived ECM. Offers more material available for weekly visits and challenging wounds with degrading enzymes.

Ideal for: supporting more complex interventions and deeper wounds, such as a delayed primary closure or graft/flap preparation.18 Commonly used for wound closure by secondary intention.16

OASIS MICRO is a micronized formulation of the value-based ECM.

Ideal for: filling tunneled or undermined wounds, ensuring the scaffold is in direct contact with the entire wound.

Need help choosing your OASIS Matrix solution? Contact us.

Promoting systematic, holistic and multidisciplinary wound care19,20

Our new T.I.M.E. clinical decision support tool (CDST) was developed with expert clinicians to promote consistency in wound care and assessment19,20, and shown to give clinicians confidence in decision-making.21

Download T.I.M.E. CDST

Other wound management solutions

 Collagenase SANTYL Ointment, for chronic dermal ulcers and severely burned areas.

 

 REGRANEX Becaplermin Gel 0.01%, for lower extremity diabetic neuropathic ulcers.

 

VERSAJET II Hydrosurgery System to help facilitate debridement and tissue preservation.

 

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO human and economic consequence of wounds.1

*The Joint Commission is an independent, not-for-profit organization. Details available on request. 

INTENDED USE: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO are indicated for the management of wounds including: partial- and full-thickness wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, chronic vascular ulcers, tunneled and/or undermined wounds, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds (abrasions, lacerations, second-degree burns, skin tears), draining wounds, surgical wounds (donor sites/grafts, post-Mohs surgery, post-laser surgery, podiatric, wound dehiscence).

CONTRAINDICATIONS: This device is derived from a porcine source and should not be used in patients with known sensitivity to porcine material.

This device is not indicated for use in third-degree burns.

PRECAUTION: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO should not be applied until excessive exudate, bleeding, acute swelling, and infection are controlled.

POTENTIAL COMPLICATIONS: The following complications are possible. If any of these conditions occur, the device should be removed: infection, chronic inflammation (initial application of wound dressings may be associated with transient, mild, localized inflammation), allergic reaction, excessive redness, pain, swelling, or blistering.

 

References:
1.    Nherera LM, Romanelli M, Trueman P, Dini V. An Overview of Clinical and Health Economic Evidence Regarding Porcine Small Intestine Submucosa Extracellular Matrix in the Management of Chronic Wounds and Burns. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2017;63(12):38-47.
2.    Badylak SF. The extracellular matrix as a scaffold for tissue reconstruction. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2002;13(5):377-383.
3.    Frantz C, Stewart KM, Weaver VM. The extracellular matrix at a glance. J Cell Sci. 2010;123(Pt 24):4195-4200.
4.    Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, Zopf D, Sherman D, Johnson C. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part 1. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.
5.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 97-010 VIIA.
6.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 97-010 VIIB.
7.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 07-057.
8.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 00-027.
9.    Brown B, Lindberg K, Reing J, Stolz DB, Badlyak SF. The basement membrane component of biologic scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix. Tissue Eng. 2006;12(3):519-526.
10.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 98-084.
11.    Hodde JP, Badylak SF, Brightman AO, Voytik-Harbin SL. Glycosaminoglycan content of small intestinal submucosa: a bioscaffold for tissue replacement. Tissue Eng. 1996;2(3):209-217.
12.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 96-006.
13.    Hurst RE, Bonner RB. Mapping of the distribution of significant proteins and proteoglycans in small intestinal submucosa by fluorescence microscopy. J Biomater Sci Polym Ed. 2001;12(11):1267-1279.
14.    Nihsen ES, Johnson CE, Hiles MC. Bioactivity of small intestinal submucosa and oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2008;21(10):479-486.
15.    Mostow EN, Haraway GD, Dalsing M, Hodde JP, King D; OASIS® Venous Ulcer Study Group. Effectiveness of an extracellular matrix graft (OASIS® Wound Matrix) in the treatment of chronic leg ulcers: a randomized clinical trial. J Vasc Surg. 2005;41(5):837-843.
16.    Cazzell SM, Lange DL, Dickerson Jr. JE, Slade HB. The management of diabetic foot ulcers with porcine small intestine submucosa tri-layer matrix: a randomized controlled trial. Adv Wound Care. 2015;4(12):711-718
17.    Barendse-Hofmann MG, Steenvoorde P, van Doorn L, Jacobi CE, Oskam J, Hedeman PP. Extracellular wound matrix (OASIS®): exploring the contraindications. Results of its use in 32 consecutive outpatient clinic cases. Wounds. 2007;19(10):258-263.
18.    Aboulssa A, Mari W, Simman R. Clinical usage of an extracellular, collagen-rich matrix: a case series. Wounds. 2015;27(11):313-318.
19.    Ousey K, Gilchrist B, Jaimes H. Understanding clinical practice challenges: a survey performed with wound care clinicians to explore wound assessment frameworks. Wounds Int. 2018;9(4):58-62.
20.    Moore Z, Dowsett C, Smith G, et al. TIME CDST: an updated tool to address the current challenges in wound care. J Wound Care. 2019;28(3):154-161.
21.    Swanson T, Duynhoven K, Johnstone D. Using the new T.I.M.E. Clinical Decision Support Tool to promote consistent holistic wound management and to eliminate variation in practice at the Cambourne Medical Clinic, Australia: Part 1. Wounds Int. 2019;10(2):28–39.

How OASIS Works

Similar composition to human dermis1-12  

Naturally derived porcine small intestinal submucosa to support pathways for cellular migration and vascular ingrowth13

OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO products are naturally derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and have a composition similar to the human dermis.1-12  Designed to support the normal physiological function in the dermis,1,2,14-21 OASIS is minimally processed to retain the natural structure of an intact ECM.3

Helps support formation of granulation tissue22-23

OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO provide a natural scaffold for the body’s host cells to migrate, repopulate and revascularize the wound by infiltrating the ECM biomaterial.13

In an in vivo animal model:*22

Angiogenesis in an animal model*24

In a murine model, small intestinal submucosa (SIS) was associated with more angiogenesis than oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC)/collagen.24  

Find more clinical evidence on the ‘Evidence in focus’ page.

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO human and economic consequence of wounds.25

*Note: these studies were performed using OASIS Matrix sheet products. The clinical significance of these data is not established.

INTENDED USE: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO are indicated for the management of wounds including: partial- and full-thickness wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, chronic vascular ulcers, tunneled and/or undermined wounds, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds (abrasions, lacerations, second-degree burns, skin tears), draining wounds, surgical wounds (donor sites/grafts, post-Mohs surgery, post-laser surgery, podiatric, wound dehiscence).

CONTRAINDICATIONS: This device is derived from a porcine source and should not be used in patients with known sensitivity to porcine material.

This device is not indicated for use in third-degree burns.

PRECAUTION: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO should not be applied until excessive exudate, bleeding, acute swelling, and infection are controlled.

POTENTIAL COMPLICATIONS: The following complications are possible. If any of these conditions occur, the device should be removed: infection, chronic inflammation (initial application of wound dressings may be associated with transient, mild, localized inflammation), allergic reaction, excessive redness, pain, swelling, or blistering.

 

References:
1.    Badylak SF. The extracellular matrix as a scaffold for tissue reconstruction. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2002;13(5):377-383.
2.    Frantz C, Stewart KM, Weaver VM. The extracellular matrix at a glance. J Cell Sci. 2010;123(Pt 24):4195-4200.
3.    Hodde J, Janis A, Ernst D, Zopf D, Sherman D, Johnson C. Effects of sterilization on an extracellular matrix scaffold: Part 1. Composition and matrix architecture. J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2007;18(4):537-543.
4.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 97-010 VIIA.
5.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 97-010 VIIB.
6.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 07-057.
7.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 00-027.
8.    Brown B, Lindberg K, Reing J, Stolz DB, Badlyak SF. The basement membrane component of biologic scaffolds derived from extracellular matrix. Tissue Eng. 2006;12(3):519-526.
9.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 98-084.
10.    Hodde JP, Badylak SF, Brightman AO, Voytik-Harbin SL. Glycosaminoglycan content of small intestinal submucosa: a bioscaffold for tissue replacement. Tissue Eng. 1996;2(3):209-217.
11.    Internal Cook Biotech Document: 96-006.
12.    Hurst RE, Bonner RB. Mapping of the distribution of significant proteins and proteoglycans in small intestinal submucosa by fluorescence microscopy. J Biomater Sci Polym Ed. 2001;12(11):1267-1279.
13.    Nihsen ES, Johnson CE, Hiles MC. Bioactivity of small intestinal submucosa and oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2008;21(10):479-486.
14.    Hodde JP, Johnson CE. Extracellular matrix as a strategy for treating chronic wounds. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2007;8(2):61-66.
15.    Chen WY, Abatangelo G. Functions of hyaluronan in wound repair. Wound Repair Regen. 1999;7(2):79-89.
16.    Sarrazin S, Lamanna WC, Esko JD. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2011;3(7):a004952.
17.    McPherson JM, Piez KA. Collagen in dermal wound repair. In: Clark RAF, Henson PM, editors. The Molecular and Biology of Wound Repair. New York: Plenum Press, 1988:471-491.
18.    Raman R, Sasisekharan V, Sasisekharan R. Structural insights into biological roles of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions. Chem Biol. 2005;12:267-277.
19.    Sottile J, Hocking DC. Fibronectin polymerization regulates the composition and stability of extracellular matrix fibrils and cell-matrix adhesion. Mol Biol Cell. 2002;13(10):3546-3559.
20.    Tzu J, Marinkovich MP. Bridging structure with function: structural, regulatory, and development role of laminins. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2008;40:199-214.
21.    Gubbiotti MA, Vallet SD, Ricard-Blum S, Iozzo RV. Decorin interacting network: A comprehensive analysis of decorin-binding partners and their versatile functions. Matrix Biol. 2016;55:7-21.
22.    Cook Biotech, Inc. internal document #04-062.
23.    Nihsen ES, Johnson CE. Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) provides a natural extracellular matrix microarchitecture for difficult to heal and chronic wounds. J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2007;34(3S):S65.
24.    Cook Biotech, Inc. internal document #07-001.
25.    Nherera LM, Romanelli M, Trueman P, Dini V. An Overview of Clinical and Health Economic Evidence Regarding Porcine Small Intestine Submucosa Extracellular Matrix in the Management of Chronic Wounds and Burns. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2017;63(12):38-47.

Indications and Application Instructions

How to use OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO

Application instructions for a range of chronic and acute wounds1

OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO provide flexibility and support for the different needs of chronic and acute wound management, including surgical and trauma wounds. Simple to store and simple to handle, OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO can be stored at room temperature and requires no advance preparation.

Supports preparation and closure of chronic and acute wounds2:

  •  Partial and full-thickness wounds
  • Pressure ulcers, venous ulcers and diabetic ulcers
  • Chronic vascular ulcers
  • Tunneled, undermined wounds
  • Abrasions and lacerations
  • Second-degree burns (not indicated for use on third-degree burns)
  • Skin tears
  • Surgical wounds
  • Draining wounds
  • Donor sites and grafts
  • Post-Mohs or post-laser surgery
  • Podiatric wounds
  • Wound dehiscence

OASIS Matrix and OASIS MICRO products are contraindicated in patients with known sensitivity to porcine materials.

How to apply OASIS Matrix products – step-by-step instructions

Prepare and debride the wound bed to ensure it’s free of exudate and devitalized tissue, ideally with the VERSAJET II Hydrosurgery System.

Choose the size and form of your OASIS Matrix solution.

OASIS Burn Matrix and OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix: 7 x 20cm, 7 x 10cm, 5 x 7cm, 3 x 7cm, 3 x 3.5cm

OASIS Wound Matrix: 3 x 7cm, 3 x 3.5cm

Apply, secure and hydrate OASIS Matrix after placing it in a dry state over the wound. Once secured, cover with both a non-adherent dressing and a secondary dressing. Maintaining a moist wound environment is essential for successful integration of OASIS.

OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix and OASIS Burn Matrix can be sutured or stapled due to being thicker, and are more appropriate for deeper wounds.

Consider an appropriate compression wrap for VLUs. Similarly, DFUs may need a boot, cast or offloading device.

Leave OASIS and non-adherent dressing in place for approximately 7 days. Change secondary dressing as needed.

 

Reapply OASIS as needed. Typically 7 days for OASIS Wound Matrix, or 7-14 days for OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix and OASIS Burn Matrix.

How to apply OASIS MICRO – step-by-step instructions

Prepare the wound using standard techniques

Apply OASIS MICRO by squeezing the bottle to lightly cover as much of the wound as possible. If needed, gently wet the application with sterile saline to ensure hydration and adherence to the wound.

Cover with a non-adherent dressing and secondary dressing. Carefully change the secondary moisture-control dressing as needed, but leave the non-adherent dressing in place until re-application.

Caramelization – what to expect

Successful application may form a caramel-colored or off-white gel on the wound surface. Known as ‘caramelization’, this contains ECM components which continue to replace deficient or missing ECM in the wound and should not be removed.

Gently cleanse the wound surface with sterile saline and apply new OASIS Matrix or OASIS MICRO if necessary.

Need help?

For additional guidance, please contact us.

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO human and economic consequence of wounds.2

*Not indicated for use in third-degree burns.

INTENDED USE: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO are indicated for the management of wounds including: partial- and full-thickness wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, chronic vascular ulcers, tunneled and/or undermined wounds, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds (abrasions, lacerations, second-degree burns, skin tears), draining wounds, surgical wounds (donor sites/grafts, post-Mohs surgery, post-laser surgery, podiatric, wound dehiscence).

CONTRAINDICATIONS: This device is derived from a porcine source and should not be used in patients with known sensitivity to porcine material.

This device is not indicated for use in third-degree burns.

PRECAUTION: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO should not be applied until excessive exudate, bleeding, acute swelling, and infection are controlled.

POTENTIAL COMPLICATIONS: The following complications are possible. If any of these conditions occur, the device should be removed: infection, chronic inflammation (initial application of wound dressings may be associated with transient, mild, localized inflammation), allergic reaction, excessive redness, pain, swelling, or blistering.

 

References:
1.    OASIS Wound Matrix, OASIS Burn Matrix, OASIS Ultra Tri-Layer Matrix, and OASIS MICRO Instructions for Use. Cook Biotech Inc.
2.    Nherera LM, Romanelli M, Trueman P, Dini V. An Overview of Clinical and Health Economic Evidence Regarding Porcine Small Intestine Submucosa Extracellular Matrix in the Management of Chronic Wounds and Burns. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2017;63(12):38-47.

Reimbursement & Resources

Reimbursement, payment information and coding assistance

There are several paths to reimbursement, depending on whether you’re operating out of a hospital (HOPD), ambulatory wound center (ASC) or physician in-office (QHP).

A reimbursement question hotline is open Monday to Friday, 9:00am to 5:30pm EST.
Call 1-888-705-0061 and a reimbursement associate can help you with:

  • Coding information – to help identify the appropriate codes required on claims
  • Tips for payer research – checklists to help facilitate insurance research. These provide tips for determining coverage, securing prior authorization, preparing appeals, and determining the reason for claim denial or underpayment
  • Medical necessity and appeal – sample letters are supplied to help expedite prior authorization and appeal
  • Insurance benefits verification – verifies patients’ specific insurance benefits for OASIS Matrix products
  • Prior authorization requirements – determines authorization requirements for qualified healthcare professional (QHP) to apply OASIS Matrix products on a specific patient, advising the QHP of prior authorization submission steps.

The simplest method of confirming insurance coverage is via our patient verification form. Download, complete every field, and send to receive a response within 48 hours. Results are faxed to your office, with OASIS Navigator conducting a follow-up call to discuss.

Download patient verification form

Payment Information

ASC payment information for OASIS Wound Matrix & OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix 

ASC payment information for OASIS Burn Matrix

 

HOPD payment information for OASIS Wound Matrix & OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix 

HOPD payment information for OASIS Burn Matrix 



Physician and QHP payment information for OASIS Wound Matrix & OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix

Physician and QHP payment information for OASIS Burn Matrix

Reimbursement acknowledgement

Information on reimbursement in the United States is provided as a courtesy. Due to the rapidly changing nature of the law and Medicare payment policy, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources, the information provided herein does not constitute a guarantee or warranty by Smith and Nephew, Inc. that reimbursement will be received.

This information is provided "as is" and without any other warranty or guarantee, expressed or implied, as to completeness or accuracy or otherwise. This information has been compiled based on data gathered from many primary and secondary sources, including the American Medical Association and certain Medicare contractors.

Physicians and other providers must confirm or clarify coding and coverage from their respective payers, as each payer may have differing formal or informal coding, coverage policies, or decisions. Physicians and providers are responsible for accurate documentation of patient conditions, and for reporting of procedures and products in accordance with particular payer requirements.

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO human and economic consequence of wounds.1

INTENDED USE: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO are indicated for the management of wounds including: partial- and full-thickness wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, chronic vascular ulcers, tunneled and/or undermined wounds, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds (abrasions, lacerations, second-degree burns, skin tears), draining wounds, surgical wounds (donor sites/grafts, post-Mohs surgery, post-laser surgery, podiatric, wound dehiscence).

CONTRAINDICATIONS: This device is derived from a porcine source and should not be used in patients with known sensitivity to porcine material.

This device is not indicated for use in third-degree burns.

PRECAUTION: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO should not be applied until excessive exudate, bleeding, acute swelling, and infection are controlled.

POTENTIAL COMPLICATIONS: The following complications are possible. If any of these conditions occur, the device should be removed: infection, chronic inflammation (initial application of wound dressings may be associated with transient, mild, localized inflammation), allergic reaction, excessive redness, pain, swelling, or blistering.

 

References:
1.    Nherera LM, Romanelli M, Trueman P, Dini V. An Overview of Clinical and Health Economic Evidence Regarding Porcine Small Intestine Submucosa Extracellular Matrix in the Management of Chronic Wounds and Burns. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2017;63(12):38-47.

Evidence in Focus

Evidence in Focus

The technology and biology behind OASIS Matrix products have been well studied, with over 1500 publications about the technology and more than 500 publications on clinical application.

Proven results across a range of wounds

In multiple clinical trials, OASIS Matrix products have demonstrated:

On diabetic foot ulcers: When used with standard of care (SoC), OASIS Wound Matrix was four times less costly than Dermagraft® over 12 weeks.*1

On chronic vascular ulcers: Wound closure was achieved in 80% of ulcers treated with OASIS Wound Matrix and SoC at 8 weeks, compared to 65% in petrolatum-treated ulcers.2 The time until complete healing with OASIS Wound Matrix and SoC was 5.4 weeks compared to 8.3 weeks for wounds treated with only moist dressings (petrolatum-impregnated gauze).**2

On pressure ulcers: 40% of patients achieved complete wound healing with OASIS Wound Matrix and SoC, compared to 29% with SoC alone.3 A 90% ulcer surface area reduction was achieved for 55% of the OASIS Wound Matrix and SoC group, compared to 38% of patients for SoC alone.***3

On venous leg ulcers: Patients treated with OASIS Wound Matrix and SoC were more than twice as likely to achieve full epithelialization at 12 weeks. Wound closure was achieved in 55% of patients, compared to 34% with SoC alone.****4

At 6-month follow-up, 100% of wounds treated with OASIS Wound Matrix and SoC remained closed, compared to 70% with SoC alone.*****4

On chronic tunneling wounds: in a case-study, OASIS MICRO - applied weekly and with daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy (covered with a non-adherent ALLEVYN Border foam dressing) - achieved a wound depth reduction each week until progressing to full closure after 3 weeks.******

Greater efficacy than standard care alone

  • OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix achieved 54% wound closure in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), compared to 32% with standard care. *******5
  • OASIS ULTRA Tri-Layer Matrix showed a significantly greater DFU wound area reduction at each visit from week 1, compared to standard care.*******5

For more clinical evidence on advanced wound management, visit Education+Evidence

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO human and economic consequence of wounds.6

 

*See references for full definition of standard of care. Wound closure p=0.021. Cost analysis based on cost of materials in 2008.

** See references for full definition of standard of care. Wound closure p<0.05. Treatment time to complete wound healing p=0.02.

*** See references for full definition of standard of care. Wound healing p=0.111, ulcer surface area p=0.037.

****OASIS Matrix with standard care (n=62) versus standard care alone (n=58). P<0.0196. Standard care in both groups included wound cleansing, debridement (as clinically necessary at the discretion of the investigator), dressing changes and compression therapy. Study was not blinded and establishment of a venous disease before enrolment was not always confirmed with duplex imaging. Epithelialization based on an odds ratio calculation from a 12-week clinical trial. See reference for more information.

*****Population of patients in follow-up was too small to determine statistical significance. Of the 54 patients followed at 6 months, 29 had achieved full wound epithelialization within the 12 week study period, with 19 patients in the treatment group vs. 10 in SOC alone.

******Smith+Nephew case study file. 62 year-old female with a chronic tunneling wound to the anterior chest wall of 4-month duration (0.2cm x 0.2cm x 2.3cm), with moderate exudate and no active infection. Prior treatments included weekly debridement and fluid management, negative pressure wound therapy, and daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy for 2 weeks.

*******OASIS ULTRA group (n=41) versus standard care (n=41) p<0.05. Standard care was selected by the investigator and included debridement of necrotic tissue, infection control, off-loading and maintenance of a moist wound environment. Study was not blinded.

INTENDED USE: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO are indicated for the management of wounds including: partial- and full-thickness wounds, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, chronic vascular ulcers, tunneled and/or undermined wounds, diabetic ulcers, trauma wounds (abrasions, lacerations, second-degree burns, skin tears), draining wounds, surgical wounds (donor sites/grafts, post-Mohs surgery, post-laser surgery, podiatric, wound dehiscence).

CONTRAINDICATIONS: This device is derived from a porcine source and should not be used in patients with known sensitivity to porcine material.

This device is not indicated for use in third-degree burns.

PRECAUTION: OASIS® Matrix and OASIS MICRO should not be applied until excessive exudate, bleeding, acute swelling, and infection are controlled.

POTENTIAL COMPLICATIONS: The following complications are possible. If any of these conditions occur, the device should be removed: infection, chronic inflammation (initial application of wound dressings may be associated with transient, mild, localized inflammation), allergic reaction, excessive redness, pain, swelling, or blistering.

Dermagraft® is a trademark of Organogenesis, Inc.

 

References:

1. Landsman A, Roukis TS, DeFronzo DJ, Agnew P, Petranto RD, Surprenant M. Living cells or collagen matrix: Which is more beneficial in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers? Wounds. 2008;20(5):111-116.
2. Romanelli M, Dini V, Bertone MS. Randomized comparison of OASIS wound matrix versus moist wound dressing in the treatment of difficult-to-heal wounds of mixed arterial/venous etiology. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2010;23(1):34-38.
3. Brown-Etris M, Milne CT., Hodde JP. An extracellular matrix graft (OASIS wound matrix) for treating full-thickness pressure ulcers: A randomized clinical trial. J Tissue Viability. 2019;28(1):21-26.
4. Mostow EN, Haraway GD, Dalsing M, Hodde JP, King D; OASIS® Venus Ulcer Study Group. Effectiveness of an extracellular matrix graft (OASIS® Wound Matrix) in the treatment of chronic leg ulcers: a randomized clinical trial. J Vasc Surg. 2005;41(5):837-843.
5. Cazzell SM, Lange DL, Dickerson JE, Slade HB. The management of diabetic foot ulcers with porcine small intestine submucosa tri-layer matrix: a randomized controlled trial. Adv Wound Care. 2015;4(12):711-718.
6. Nherera LM, Romanelli M, Trueman P, Dini V. An Overview of Clinical and Health Economic Evidence Regarding Porcine Small Intestine Submucosa Extracellular Matrix in the Management of Chronic Wounds and Burns. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2017;63(12):38-47.

Reimbursement

For guidance and support on reimbursement, please call 1-888-705-0061.

To place an order, or for additional information and guidance on OASIS Wound Matrix and OASIS MICRO products:

Contact us