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T- Tissue

New Smith & Nephew T.I.M.E. wound assessment tool for wound bed tissue viability.
The products used in the T.I.M.E. clinical decision support tool may vary in different markets.  Not all products referred to may be approved for use or available in all markets.  Please consult your local Smith & Nephew representative for further details on products available in your market.
Intended for healthcare professionals outside of the US only.

 

Develop and promote viable, healthy wound bed tissue

Devitalised or non-viable tissue has no blood supply and will not repair with time or treatment. Presence of this tissue will delay healing and prevent granulation1. To help optimise treatment efficacy, non-viable tissue must first be removed to allow the wound to heal1-4.

Choosing the correct debridement method

Debridement choice should take into consideration the patient’s circumstances and wellbeing, practitioner expertise and available resources.

 

How flourescent bacterial visualisation and accurate debridement can help prevent the development of infection >

 

  Autolytic – dressings that optimise a moist wound environment and aid autolysis to break down non-viable tissue. Selective, painless and easy, but can be slow and increase the risk of infection1.
  Sharp – Scissors, forceps or a scalpel can provide fast and selective debridement, but requires the appropriate level of skill and knowledge1.
  Surgical – Carried out in the operating theatre, often by a surgeon, involving complete debridement of the wound bed down to healthy, viable tissue through instant removal of all dead tissue. It may occasionally cause a larger wound due sacrificed viable tissue, and often requires anaesthetic and continued analgesia1.
  Larval – The use of maggots to kill bacteria and promote fibroblast growth1. Biological debridement can be quick and selective, but potentially costly and not readily accepted by all patients1.
  The VERSAJET Hydrosurgery System delivers pressurised saline as a cutting tool for quick, selective debridement with minimal loss of viable tissue. Although not necessarily carried out in theatre, hydrosurgery may require anaesthetic to manage patient pain1,5-6.

 

Hydrosurgery – Speed precision and accuracy of VERSAJET debridement on chronic wounds >

 

Assess the wound to identify the right treatment or intervention

Using our T.I.M.E. decision support tool 

 

Necrotic: treat with hydrogel following debridement*

INTRASITE GEL Hydrogel Wound Dressings
INTRASITE CONFORMABLE Hydrogel Wound Dressings

 

 

Slough: treat with a deslougher following debridement*

IODOSORB Cadexomer Iodine Ointment, Gel or Powder

 

  Next step > Evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and progression towards your wound management goal.

 

For additional product information or ordering instructions, arrange a call from a Smith & Nephew representative.

 

Helping you get CLOSER TO ZERO delay in wound healing.

 

A healthcare professional must always rely on his or her own professional clinical judgment when deciding whether to use a particular product when treating a particular patient. Smith & Nephew does not dispense medical advice and recommends that healthcare professionals be trained in the use of any particular product before using it on patients.

 

For detailed product information, including indications for use, contraindications, effects, precautions, warnings, and important safety information, please consult the Instructions for Use (IFU) prior to use.

*Use appropriate secondary dressings according to your local protocol. View example dressings in the ALLEVYN or OPSITE ranges.

 

Referencing


1) Atkin L. 2014, ‘Understanding methods of wound debridement’, British Journal of Nursing, 23, pp. S10-5.
2) Wilcox JR, Carter MJ, Covington S. (2013) Frequency of debridements and time to heal: a retrospective cohort study of 312, 744 wounds. JAMA Dermatol 149(9).
3) Grothier L. 2015, ‘Improving clinical outcomes and patient experience through the use of desloughing’, British Journal Of Community Nursing, 20, Sup9, pp. S25-31.
4) European Wound Management Association (EWMA). Position Document: Wound Bed Preparation in Practice. London: MEP Ltd, 2004.
5) Granick MS, et al. “Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a high-powered parallel waterjet for wound debridement”, Wound Repair And Regeneration, 2006, 14, 394-397.
6) Madhok BM, Vowden K, Vowden P.(2013), New techniques for wound debridement. Int Wound J, 10: 247–251.

Download the T.I.M.E. clinical decision tool

Download now

 

The products used in the T.I.M.E. clinical decision support tool may vary in different markets.  Not all products referred to may be approved for use or available in all markets.  Please consult your local Smith & Nephew representative for further details on products available in your market.
Intended for healthcare professionals outside of the US only.