ACTICOAT

Antimicrobial Barrier Dressing

Product Information

ACTICOAT Dressings offer powerful antimicrobial barrier protection. Only ACTICOAT maintains safe bactericidal concentrations of silver with patented nanocrystalline technology.

Click here for more info about ACTICOAT Flex 3 & 7 ACTICOAT Flex 3 & 7
 
Click here for more info about ACTICOAT Acticoat Burn
Click here for more info ACTICOAT 7 Acticoat 7
Click here for more info about ACTICOAT Absorbent Acticoat Absorbent

Click here for more info ACTICOAT Moisture Control

Acticoat Moisture Control
Click here for more info about ACTICOAT Site Acticoat Site
Click here for more info about ACTICOAT Surgical Acticoat Post Op

 

ACTICOAT is a unique antimicrobial barrier dressing that offers: 

Performance

  • ACTICOAT destroys bacteria within the dressing and at the wound site.
  • Kills bacteria in vitro in as little as 30 minutes, 2-5 times faster than other forms of silver7,8,9,10.
  • The antimicrobial barrier remains effective for up to 3 days,5 increasing convenience for patient and caregiver.

Protection

  •  ACTICOAT is an effective barrier to a broad spectrum of wound micro-organisms1.

Intended use...

  •  As an antimicrobial barrier layer over partial and full-thickness wounds such as: first and second degree burns and donor and recipient graft sites, pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, and diabetic ulcers.


ACTICOAT 7 & ACTICOAT Absorbent managing chronic wounds 

 Acticoat Product Information Managing chronic wounds

The need...

  • Sustained protection of the wound site from external bacterial contamination.

The solution...

  • ACTICOAT 7 and ACTICOAT Absorbent (with SILCRYST™ Nanocrystals).
  • Revolutionary technology that provides a new class of silver antimicrobial barrier.

Performance...

  • ACTICOAT 7 and ACTICOAT Absorbent destroy bacteria within the dressing and at the wound site.
  • Kills bacteria in vitro in as little as 30 minutes, 2-5 times faster than other forms of silver7,8,9,10.
  • The antimicrobial barrier remains effective for up to 7 days6, increasing convenience for patient and caregivers.

Protection...

  • ACTICOAT 7 and ACTICOAT Absorbent is an effective barrier to a broad spectrum of wound micro organisms1,3,5

Intended use...

  • As an antimicrobial barrier, layer over partial and full-thickness wounds such as: pressure ulcers, venous ulcers, diabetic ulcers, burns and donor and recipient graft sites.


ACTICOAT & ACTICOAT 7 composition

  1. Silver coated high density polyethylene mesh – The Silver coated HDPE (high density polyethylene) layers are designed to be barriers against microbial infection of a wound. ACTICOAT 7 helps protect the wound site from bacterial contamination.
  2. Ultrasonic welds  – The wound contact layer, inner core and outer layers are hygienically laminated in place with sonic welds. They allow dressing to maintain its integrity.
  3. Rayon/polyester core – Absorbent inner core helps maintain the moist environment that can facilitate wound healing.

ACTICOAT is a highly conformable silver antimicrobial barrier dressing which remains effective for 3 days. The Nanocrystalline coating of silver rapidly kills a broad spectrum of bacteria in as little as 30mins and protects the wound site from bacterial contamination while the inner core helps maintain moist wound environment.

ACTICOAT Absorbent composition

  • Highly absorbent dressing  – Gels on contact with wound exudate. 
  • Antimicrobial coating – Provides antimicrobial performance for up to 3 days. ACTICOAT Absorbent is a silver coated highly absorbent alginate dressing which remains effective for 3 days and has a 7-day wear time. The dressing combines all the antimicrobial benefits of ACTICOAT with a highly absorbent alginate to provide a moist wound environment, high absorbency and the antimicrobial power of silver delivered within the dressing and to the wound bed.

Learn more

 

Wound Bed Preparation

ACTICOAT Dressings contribute to effective Wound Bed Preparation.
Click here for more information on Wound Bed Preparation.

Technology

Background to Silver

Silver is effective:

  • used for centuries to prevent and treat infection
  • powerful antimicrobial and bactericidal actions
  • silver is a commonly used topical antimicrobial agent.

To be effective, silver must be available at concentrations in excess of the MIC and preferably the MBC. MIC = Minimum Inhibitory concentration
MBC= Minimum Bactericidal concentration.

Minimum inhibitory concentration of ACTICOAT MIC
(µg/ml)
Staphylococcus aureus 12.5
Staphylococcus epidermidis 10.0
Eschericia coli 7.5
Klebsiella pneumoniae 5.0
Pseudomonas aeruginosa 7.5

Yin et al, J Burn Care and Rehabil.1999;20:195-2001
µg/ml = PPM


All active silver is ionic... All silver products which are biologically active release ionic silver (Ag+). Ionic silver must be in solution to be biologically active and able to act as an antimicrobial. Nanocrystalline Silver...

  • SILCRYSTNanocrystals are the patented technology used by ACTICOAT. SILCRYST Nanocrystals are comprised of Nanocrystalline Silver.
  • Nanocrystalline Silver is a revolutionary technology that provides a new class of Silver antimicrobial barrier protection.
  • Nanocrystalline Silver releases silver ions faster than normal silver.
  • Nanocrystalline Silver has increased antimicrobial activity.

Mode of Action of Nanocrystalline Silver... The Nanocrystalline silver mediates the antimicrobial activity of ACTICOAT. When the dressing is moistened with sterile water or wound exudate, it activates the release of silver ions into solution where it provides antimicrobial activity within the dressing. Moisture is required for the continual release of silver.

Results

In Vitro Data

ACTICOAT & ACTICOAT 7

  • Sustained Silver Release...
    Sustained release of Nanocrystalline silver provides an antimicrobial barrier, reducing risk of colonization11,22. 
  • Kills Bacteria....
    Kills bacteria in vitro in as little as 30 minutes, 2-5 times faster than other forms of silver7,8,9,10
  • Longevity...
    The antimicrobial barrier remains effective for up to 3 days for ACTICOAT and 7 days for ACTICOAT 7 increasing convenience for the patient and caregiver6.

 ACTICOAT Absorbent

  • Sustained Silver Release...
    Sustained release of Nanocrystalline silver provides an antimicrobial barrier, reducing risk of colonization7,8
  • Longevity...
    The antimicrobial barrier remains effective for up to 3 days for ACTICOAT and 7 days for ACTICOAT 7 increasing convenience for the patient and caregiver5.



ACTICOAT case studies

 

ACTICOAT 7 case studies 

 

ACTICOAT Absorbent case studies  

References

References

ACTICOAT & ACTICOAT 7

  1. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0109003, Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Properties of Nanocrystalline Silver
  2. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0110002, A Comparative In-Vitro Evaluation of ACTICOAT Against Clinically Relevant Bacteria.
  3. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0107010, A Comparative In-Vitro Evaluation of ACTICOAT Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.
  4. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0110001, A Comparative In-Vitro Evaluation of ACTICOAT Against Yeast Isolates.
  5. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0110004, The In-Vitro Longevity of Antimicrobial Barrier Properties of ACTICOAT Against Clinically Relevant Bacteria.
  6. Data on file, Scientific Background # 109002, Long Term Evaluation of ACTICOAT 7 Barrier Dressing against MRSA.
  7. Wright JB et al. Wounds 1998:10(6):179-188
  8. Yin HQ et al . J. Burn Care Rehabil 1998, 19:531-537
  9. Wright JB et al . Am J Infect Control 1998, 26:572-577
  10. Wright JB et al. Am J Infect Control 1999, 27:344-350
  11. Tredget EE et al. J. Burn Care Rehabil 1998, 19 531-537
  12. Sibbald RG et al. Ostomy/Wound Management 2001, 47(10) 38-43.


ACTICOAT Absorbent

  1. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0109003, Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Properties of Nanocrystalline Silver
  2. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0110002, A Comparative In-Vitro Evaluation of ACTICOAT Against Clinically Relevant Bacteria.
  3. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0107010, A Comparative In-Vitro Evaluation of ACTICOAT Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.
  4. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0110001, A Comparative In-Vitro Evaluation of ACTICOAT Against Yeast Isolates.
  5. Data on file, Scientific Background # 0110004, The In-Vitro Longevity of Antimicrobial Barrier Properties of ACTICOAT Against Clinically Relevant Bacteria.
  6. Data on file, Scientific Background # 109002, Long Term Evaluation of ACTICOAT 7 Barrier Dressing against MRSA.
  7. Tredget EE et al. J. Burn Care Rehabil 1998, 19 531-537
  8. Sibbald RG et al. Ostomy/Wound Management 2001, 47(10) 38-43

Frequently asked questions

  1. Is the ACTICOAT Antimicrobial Barrier active against resistant micro organisms such as Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE)?
    Answer: ACTICOAT with SILCRYST nanocrystals has been demonstrated in vitro to be effective against 150 micro organisms including resistant micro organisms such as MSRA and VRE. Staphylococcus aureus (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA)
    Enterococcus faecium (Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus or VRE)
    Enterococcus fecalis
    Burkholderia cepacia
    Alcaligenes sp.
    Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    Klebsiella pneumoniae
    Pseudomonas sp.
    Acinetobacter sp.
    Citrobacter koseri
  2. Is the ACTICOAT Antimicrobial Barrier compatible with various cleansing agents?
    Answer: Many agents or solutions have been traditionally used to cleanse burn wounds. If these agents do not contain an oil base or leave a residue they may be used to cleanse the wound.
  3. What do you do if a patient is admitted with other antimicrobials or dressings already applied?
    Answer: It is recommended to remove all agents unless compatibility has been demonstrated.
  4. Can you overlap the ACTICOAT Antimicrobial Barrier?
    Answer:Yes, the ACTICOAT Antimicrobial Barrier may be overlapped without any concern.
  5. Can the ACTICOAT Antimicrobial Barrier be used with patients who will undergo MRI?
    Answer: The ACTICOAT Antimicrobial Barrier is not compatible with Magnetic resonance imaging.
  6. Why can't saline be used to moisten ACTICOAT?
    Answer: Saline contains chloride. If chloride ions are added to silver, a white solid called Silver Chloride is formed.
    Ag+ + Cl- = AgCl
    This Silver Chloride solid will greatly reduced the efficacy of the sustained silver release of the ACTICOAT dressing. Although there will be trace amounts of sodium chloride-salt in the wound bed already there will not be sufficient quantities of chloride ions to inactivate all silver ions.
  7. What does Nanocrystalline mean and why does size matter?
    Answer: Nanocrystalline †, as in ACTICOAT Nanocrystalline silver, is a reference to size. Nano means small…very, very small. When silver is deposited onto the ACTICOAT dressing during the manufacturing process, it is done via a patented process which deposits very, very small “clumps” of silver onto the dressing. These small “clumps” are extremely porous and greatly enhance the surface area from which ionisation and the dissolution of silver ions can occur.
  8. Why is more parts per million (PPM) important?
    Answer: PPM is "parts per million" and is a measure of concentration (PPM is also the same thing as milligrams per liter). For an agent that kills microbes, such as ionic silver, PPM is important because in order to kill the microbes, the silver must be present in adequate concentrations. In complex biological fluids such as wound exudate, ionic silver must be present in concentrations of roughly 20 PPM or greater to have bactericidal activity. Products that release higher than 20 PPM of ionic silver are highly effective antimicrobial agents. The concentration of ionic silver released from ACTICOAT is 70-100 PPM1.
  9. How can bacteriostatic silver products lead to resistance?
    Answer: There has not been a documented clinical case regarding resistance to silver in either form (bacteriostatic or bactericidal agent), however, silver-resistant organisms have been developed in the lab (Li et al, 1997). Regarding other non-silver antimicrobial agents, if you don't kill the bugs, you give them a chance to mutate and potentially develop resistance as they have an opportunity to respond to the challenge by mutating to resistant forms. One of the key benefits of ACTICOAT is that the quick kill or bactericidal effect is so fast and immediate (within 30 minutes of dressing application), that building any type of resistance is virtually impossible.
  10. What is the difference between log reduction and % reduction?
    Answer: Logarithms are a unit of measure typically used by microbiologists in testing scenarios. Smith & Nephew uses logarithms as a way to measure the reduction of colony forming units (CFU) on a wound. You can see this label used on the Y-Axis (up and down or left side) of graphs displayed in the ACTICOAT product brochures, while time is displayed on the X-Axis (left to right or the bottom of the graphs). For instance, let's say that a wound has an initial bug concentration of log 7 CFU's, which equals 10 to the 7th power, or 10,000,000 (1 with 7 zeros). ACTICOAT will kill pathogens in as little as 30 minutes after application. We can see this graphically as the Log CFU/ml reduces from the initial log 7 CFU's to Log 0 CFU's within .5 of an hour. Other silver dressings typically uses % reduction, not log reduction, in defining the strength of their dressing. They will say that the use of the dressing will decrease the CFU concentration by 90%. 90% reduction in CFU concentration only equals 1 log. This means that the CFU concentration decreases from 10 to the 7th power, to 10 to the 6th power. That is to say, it decreased from 10,000,000 to 1,000,000. Very few bugs are killed and there are still 1,000,000 CFU's left.
  11. Can ACTICOAT 7 be used under PROFORE, regardless if the wound is infected?
    Answer: If the wound shows clinical signs of infection (advancing erythema in the surrounding tissue, warmth, tenderness, oedema/induration, fever), the use of ACTICOAT or PROFORE are not recommended. It is generally accepted that the infection must be treated first and since the signs and symptoms are extending beyond the wound into the surrounding tissue, then systemic antibiotics are indicated. However, venous ulcers are prone to bacterial burden and the signs and symptoms are generally contained within the wound margins, for example, increased serous drainage, friable granulation tissue, impaired healing, and the absence of normal granulation tissue. In this case, ACTICOAT may be used with Profore and the wound should be assessed and monitored at regular intervals.
  12. Why does a “slimy” film sometimes appear on the wound bed after application of ACTICOAT?
    Answer: Sometimes a “slimy” film will appear on the wound bed (typically around day 3) after the application of ACTICOAT. This film is referred to as a “benign coagulum” and is considered normal. Clinically, it does no harm and seems to be re-absorbed by the wound or absorbed by the dressing around day 4-5, if the wound and dressing are kept moist. This “benign coagulum” may also persist under dry conditions. In general, the film does not need to be washed off or removed with each dressing change. It is believed that the “benign coagulum” is a mixture of fibrin and denatured proteins. This film is most often seen on partial thickness wounds, such as donor sites.
  13. Why does ACTICOAT promote some staining or discoloration in the wound?
    Answer: Staining, discoloration, or silver specks may appear in the wound bed after the application of ACTICOAT because when silver oxidizes, it turns black. The discoloration or presence of silver specks is temporary and will dissipate over a 2-14 day period. This causes no harm to the patient. Also, the healthy skin surrounding the wound may have a light brown, yellow or black staining where the ACTICOAT has overlapped the healthy skin. Again, this is normal and should not be a concern to the clinician or patient. The note, “may cause transient discoloration” is referred to in the Instructions for Use package insert.
  14. Why does the application of ACTICOAT cause a stinging sensation with some patients?
    Answer: Stinging upon the application of ACTICOAT has been reported in some patients. The stinging can be uncomfortable, but is usually transient and will typically disappear in 10 - 20 minutes (it appears that stinging is mostly observed with any treatment that involves a partial-thickness burn injury). Stinging can be reduced in many cases by placing the moistened ACTICOAT on sterile gauze for 2-3 minutes to drain excess water prior to application. If the patient continues to feel a stinging sensation, a silver sensitivity may be involved and the use of ACTICOAT should be discontinued.
  15. Can ACTICOAT be used simultaneously with electrical stimulation?
    Answer: The silver in ACTICOAT could interfere or intensify the electrical current since Ag+ is a good conductor of electricity. Our recommendation is to remove the ACTICOAT dressing and irrigate the wound with sterile water prior to the patient undergoing electrical stimulation therapy.
  16. Can ACTICOAT be used post-operatively on a non-chronic wound, like a sternal incision?
    Answer: ACTICOAT can and does play a large role in preventing infection on post-operative wounds in acute settings. It has been used as a prophylactic to prevent post-operative infection in high-risk patients, who may get exposed to bacterial or infection causing organisms during their surgery. For these types of patients, the prevention of infection is a key requirement for the wound healing process. Additionally, it is recognized that open wounds that are not clinically infected can be heavily colonized, thus impairing wound healing. ACTICOAT is promoted as a barrier for bacterial penetration and for the management of more heavily colonized non-infected chronic wounds.