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IV3000

IV3000

 Moisture Responsive Catheter Dressing

IV3000is a dedicated range of IV dressings designed to meet the demands of modern IV site care. The moisture-responsive technology11 of IV3000 reacts in the presence of moisture or water by removing it from underneath the dressing, maintaining optimum conditions for the IV incision site which may reduce bacterial growth1-4, and in turn, help the dressing stay in place.

IV3000 Advantages

References

1. M. Richardson, An in vivo assessment of the microbial proliferation beneath transparent film dressing, D. G. Maki, Ed., Improving catheter site care. Royal Society of Medicine Services International Congress and Symposium Series No.179. Royal Society of Medicine Services Limited, 1991, pp. 29-33. 2. B. Joyeux, OPSITE™ IV3000 versus Tegaderm™ on peripheral venous catheters, D. G. Maki, Ed., Improving catheter site care. Royal Society of Medicine Services International Congress and Symposium Series No.179. Royal Society of Medicine Services Limited, 1991, pp. 53-55. 3. D. G. M. Maki, S. S. M. Stolz, S. B. Wheeler and L. A. D. S. Memel, “A prospective, randomized trial of gauze and two polyurethane dressings for site care of pulmonary artery catheters: Implications for catheter management,” Critcial Care Medicine, vol. 22, no. 11, pp. 1729-1737, 1994. 4. D. G. Maki, “Preliminary Analysis of Data from the Triple-Lumen Central Venous Catheter Study,” 1992. 5. Smith & Nephew, “Data On File Report 0505005. In-vitro,” 2005. 6. Smith & Nephew, “Bacteria barrier testing of IV3000 Report WRP-TW042-281,” 2003. 7. Smith & Nephew, Bacterial Viral Barrier Claim For IV3000 Transparent Dressing Family. Statement Reference 200409902-01, 2004. 8. S. Wheeler, S. Stolz and D. Maki, “A prospective, randomized, three-way clinical comparison of a novel, highly permeable, polyurethane dressing with 206 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters: OPSITE IV3000 vs Tegaderm vs gauze and tape,” pp. 67-72, 1991. 9. J. Willie, B. Van Oud Alblas and E. Thewessen, “A comparison of two transparent film-type dressing in central vanous therapy,” Journal of Hospital Infection, vol. 23, pp. 113-121, 1993. 10. M. Besley, OPSITE IV3000: potential for improved quality of life for haemodialysis patients with permanent central venous catheters, D. G. Maki, Ed., Improving catheter site care. Royal Society of Medicine Services International Congress and Synposium Series No. 179. Royal Society of Medicine Services Limited, 1991, pp. 57-59. 11. L. Tompkins, “Data on File Report DS/07/224/R1a. IV3000 I-Hand Physical Properties.,” 2008. 12. “Preventing Hospital- Acquired Infection- Clinical Guidelines Public Health Laboratory Service,” 1997. 13. G. Walton, “Safety Statement,” 2011. 14. A. Wallace and B. Davy, “Report Ref. L/75A/23. To evaluate the skin response to, and tape performance of, single and repeat applications of high MVP dressings in human volunteers.,” 1985. 15. D. Maki and M. Ringer, “Evalutation of Dressing Regimens for Prevention of Infection With Peripheral Intravenous Catheters,” JAMA, vol. 258, no. 17, pp. 2395-2403, 6 Nov 1987. 16. M. Neufeld, A Randomized Control Trial of the effectiveness of Opsite Wound versus IV3000 in maintaining and Occlusive Central Line Dressing, McMaster University Canada, 1991. 17. D. R. R. Keenlyside, “Avoiding an unnecessary outcome. A comparative trial between IV3000 and a conventional film dressing to assess rates of catheter-related sepsis,” Professional Nurse, pp. 288-291, February 1993. 18. C. Latta and C. Grant, “IV3000 dressing on Permcath exit sites,” 1996. 19. Tegaderm v IV3000 test report August 2015- DS.15.168.R3 Physical testing of Tegaderm film products. (in-vitro) 20. Smith & Nephew Wound Management Data On File Report – DS/09/083/R1 July 2009. (in-vitro). 21. DS.11.027.R1 Tegaderm IV Advanced MVP and WTR. (in-vitro). 22. DS.07.224.R4a Mepore IV. (in-vitro). 23. DS.07.224.R5a Hydrofilm (in-vitro). 24. DS.15.241.R Physical testing of Clear Film IV. (in-vitro)

For Patients. For Budgets. For Today.*

Giving more to you and your patients

IV3000 patientFor you

  • Ward educational packages and animated tools to make application training straightforward
  • Support from clinical specialists to answer complex questions on IV site care
  • Visual infusion phlebitis scoring tools to help you spot inflamed blood vessels before they become a problem

For your patients

  • IV3000 dressings are waterproof so patients needn't remove them every time they want a shower 5
  • Our low allergy, non-irritating adhesive is easy to remove, allowing greater patient comfort 16,17
  • Long-lasting dressings mean fewer uncomfortable dressing changes 18

An IV-site that protects your budget too

Catheter-related bloodstream infections cost around £6,000 per infection to treat. 13

Reducing bacterial propagation near the IV site is one way of reducing this risk. 8 Another way is to limit exposure of the IV site to the surrounding environment.

IV3000 dressings can be kept in place for up to seven days, meaning fewer dressing changes and less chance of bacterial infection. 19

This also:

  • creates less need for dressing changes, reducing nursing time
  • minimises potential for catheter dislodgement, which can help avoid the extra expense of recannulating a patient

References

1. Jones A. Dressings for the Management of Catheter Sites. JAVA 2004; 9: 26-33
2. Pratt RJ et al. epic2: National Evidence-based Guidelines for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in NHS Hospitals in England. J Hosp Inf 2007; 65S: S1-S64
3. Richardson, MC (1991) An in-vivo assessment of microbial proliferation under transparent film dressings. In Maki, DG, Ed., International Congress and symposium Series No 179, 'Improving catheter site care'. Royal Society of Medicine Series, London, New York, 29-33
4. Smith & Nephew 2008 Laboratory Report DS/07/224/R3a (in-vitro)
5. Smith & Nephew 2008 Laboratory Report DS/07/224/R1a (in-vitro)
6. Smith & Nephew 2011 Laboratory Report DS/11/027/R1 (in-vitro)
7. Smith & Nephew 2008 Laboratory Report DS/07/224/R4a (in-vitro)
8. Treston-Aurand, J et al. Impact of Dressing Materials on Central Venous Catheter Infection Rates. J Intraven Nurs 1997; 20: 201-6
9. Smith & Nephew Data On File Report - 0505005 (in-vitro)
10. Statement reference 200409902-01 Bacterial Viral Barrier claim for IV3000 Transparent Dressing Family
11. Campbell H, Carrington M. Peripheral IV cannula dressings: advantages and disadvantages. Br J Nurs. 1999; 8: 1420-2, 1424-7
12. Tripepi-Bova KA, Woods KD, Loach MC. A comparison of transparent polyurethane and dry gauze dressings for peripheral i.v. catheter sites: rates of phlebitis, infiltration, and dislodgment by patients. Am J Crit Care. 1997; 6: 377-81
13. Department of Health (2007). Saving Lives: reducing infection, delivering clean and safe care. High Impact Intervention No: 1 Central Venous Catheter Care Bundle
14. Department of Health (2003). Winning Ways - Guidelines for working together to reduce Healthcare Associated Infection in England - report from the Chief Medical Officer
15. RCN Standards for infusion therapy, third edition, January 2010
16. Walton G. Safety statement, January 2011
17. Wheeler S et al. A prospective, randomised, three-way clinical comparison of a novel, highly permeable, polyurethane dressing with 206 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters: OPSITE IV3000 vs. Tegaderm vs. gauze and tape. II. Nursing issues: effectiveness and tolerance as catheter dressings. In: Maki, DG, ed, International Congress and Symposia Series No. 179, 'Improving Catheter Site Care', Royal Society of Medicine Series, London, New York, 1991, 67-72. (in-vitro)
18. Neufeld, M. A randomised control trial of effectiveness of OPSITE Wound vs. IV3000 in maintaining an occlusive central line dressing. McMaster University, Canada 1991. (in-vitro)
19. Besley, M. OPSITE IV3000: Potential for improved quality of life for haemodialysis patients with permanent central venous catheters in Maki, D G ed. International Congress and Symposium Series No 179 Improving Catheter Site Care, Royal Society of Medical Services Ltd, London. New York, 1991 57-59 (in-vitro)
20. Smith & Nephew 2007 ACTICOAT Site Dressing: A summary of absorbent capacity, antimicrobial and silver release properties (in-vitro)
21. Smith & Nephew Data On File Report - 0305006 (in-vitro)
22. Smith & Nephew 2004 Laboratory Report - DS/04/096/R1 (in-vitro)
23. Smith & Nephew Data On File Report - WRPTSG002-06-01ii (in-vitro)

Product Range

Whatever the site we've got it covered

Smith & Nephew has a range of dressings for every kind of IV site which can be applied and removed easily and aseptically

IV3000 product range

The IV3000 dressing portfolio gives the IV practitioner a choice of application methods. Three ranges are available - The 1-hand, the Standard (Orange Handled) range and the Framed Delivery option. The dressings are available in a variety of shapes & sizes to meet required applications.

OPSITE* Post-Op dressingsOPSITE◊ Post-Op dressings from Smith & Nephew

OPSITE Post-Op dressings, designed to help you keep protecting from infection even after the IV line is removed

Click here for further details on OPSITE Post-Op

 

ACTICOAT◊ Site from Smith & Nephew

ACTICOAT Site dressing

ACTICOAT Site, an absorbent, antimicrobial IV site dressing which kills bacteria in as little as two hours for patients at high risk of infection 20-23

Click here for further details on ACTICOAT Site

References

1. Jones A. Dressings for the Management of Catheter Sites. JAVA 2004; 9: 26-33
2. Pratt RJ et al. epic2: National Evidence-based Guidelines for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in NHS Hospitals in England. J Hosp Inf 2007; 65S: S1-S64
3. Richardson, MC (1991) An in-vivo assessment of microbial proliferation under transparent film dressings. In Maki, DG, Ed., International Congress and symposium Series No 179, 'Improving catheter site care'. Royal Society of Medicine Series, London, New York, 29-33
4. Smith & Nephew 2008 Laboratory Report DS/07/224/R3a (in-vitro)
5. Smith & Nephew 2008 Laboratory Report DS/07/224/R1a (in-vitro)
6. Smith & Nephew 2011 Laboratory Report DS/11/027/R1 (in-vitro)
7. Smith & Nephew 2008 Laboratory Report DS/07/224/R4a (in-vitro)
8. Treston-Aurand, J et al. Impact of Dressing Materials on Central Venous Catheter Infection Rates. J Intraven Nurs 1997; 20: 201-6
9. Smith & Nephew Data On File Report - 0505005 (in-vitro)
10. Statement reference 200409902-01 Bacterial Viral Barrier claim for IV3000 Transparent Dressing Family
11. Campbell H, Carrington M. Peripheral IV cannula dressings: advantages and disadvantages. Br J Nurs. 1999; 8: 1420-2, 1424-7
12. Tripepi-Bova KA, Woods KD, Loach MC. A comparison of transparent polyurethane and dry gauze dressings for peripheral i.v. catheter sites: rates of phlebitis, infiltration, and dislodgment by patients. Am J Crit Care. 1997; 6: 377-81
13. Department of Health (2007). Saving Lives: reducing infection, delivering clean and safe care. High Impact Intervention No: 1 Central Venous Catheter Care Bundle
14. Department of Health (2003). Winning Ways - Guidelines for working together to reduce Healthcare Associated Infection in England - report from the Chief Medical Officer
15. RCN Standards for infusion therapy, third edition, January 2010
16. Walton G. Safety statement, January 2011
17. Wheeler S et al. A prospective, randomised, three-way clinical comparison of a novel, highly permeable, polyurethane dressing with 206 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters: OPSITE IV3000 vs. Tegaderm vs. gauze and tape. II. Nursing issues: effectiveness and tolerance as catheter dressings. In: Maki, DG, ed, International Congress and Symposia Series No. 179, 'Improving Catheter Site Care', Royal Society of Medicine Series, London, New York, 1991, 67-72. (in-vitro)
18. Neufeld, M. A randomised control trial of effectiveness of OPSITE Wound vs. IV3000 in maintaining an occlusive central line dressing. McMaster University, Canada 1991. (in-vitro)
19. Besley, M. OPSITE IV3000: Potential for improved quality of life for haemodialysis patients with permanent central venous catheters in Maki, D G ed. International Congress and Symposium Series No 179 Improving Catheter Site Care, Royal Society of Medical Services Ltd, London. New York, 1991 57-59 (in-vitro)
20. Smith & Nephew 2007 ACTICOAT Site Dressing: A summary of absorbent capacity, antimicrobial and silver release properties (in-vitro)
21. Smith & Nephew Data On File Report - 0305006 (in-vitro)
22. Smith & Nephew 2004 Laboratory Report - DS/04/096/R1 (in-vitro)
23. Smith & Nephew Data On File Report - WRPTSG002-06-01ii (in-vitro)

Ordering Information

The IV3000 range of dressings for IV site care from Smith & Nephew

Click here to view application videos of the IV3000 range on our YouTube channel.

1-Hand Simple aseptic technique with securing strips and documentation label

Product Size Code Qty Recommended indications
 IV3000-frame10x12 5cm x 6cm 66004011 100 Paediatric/Peripheral

IV3000-6x7

6cm x 7cm 4007 100 Peripheral

IV3000-7x9

7cm x 9cm 4006 100 Ported/Peripheral
 IV3000-9x12 9cm x 12cm 66004009 50 Central/Jugular
 IV3000-10x12 10cm x 12cm 4008 50 Central
 IV3000-11x14 11cm x 14cm 66800512 25 PICC Midline

 

Standard (Orange-handles) Incorporates tape for security or fixation

Product Size Code Quantity Recommended indications
 IV3000-6x8-5 6cm x 8.5cm

4924

100 Peripheral

IV3000-6x8

6cm x 8cm 4923 100 Peripheral/Ported

IV3000-10x14

10cm x 14cm 4925 10 Central/Jugular

IV3000-10x14

10cm x 14cm 4973 50 Central/Jugular
 IV3000-10x20 10cm x 20cm 4649 50 Central/Epidural

 

Frame Delivery Quick and easy application

Product Size Code Quantity Recommended indications
 IV3000-6x7 6cm x 7cm

59410082

100 Peripheral

IV3000-frame10x12

10cm x 12cm 59410882 50 Central

 

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Patients

Smith & Nephew is providing information in this site for general educational use only, and does not intend for this to be construed as medical advice or used as a substitute for the advice of your physician. For questions or concerns about a previous or upcoming surgery, Smith & Nephew recommends that you contact your healthcare professional.