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‡ In these countries please contact our distributor

For healthcare providers

About Leaf

The most important turn is your next one

The Leaf Patient Monitoring System may help simplify pressure ulcer/injury prevention protocols so you may have more time for personalized care.1 It’s precision timing under pressure.

The system
Leaf wirelessly monitors patient positioning and movement, and as part of a full pressure ulcer/injury prevention protocol, may help reduce the risk of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers/injuries (HAPU/HAPIs).2 It’s the real-time information you need to help make your life easier.
• Provides automated documentation, which may help to reduce a traditional burden on nurses1
• Minimizes chance of patient being positioned on high-risk areas and helps prevent progression of pre-existing pressure ulcers/injuries
• Records when a patient self-turns to help avoid unnecessary staff-assisted turns
• Facilitates customized turning for each patient per your facility’s guidelines
• Shown to save money by reducing HAPU/HAPI incidence and increasing efficiency3

The sensors
These small sensors, placed only on high-risk patients, support your staff’s ongoing efforts toward pressure ulcer/injury prevention.2,4-6
• Single-patient use
• Adheres using a transparent film dressing
• Battery lasts up to 21 days
• Waterproof
• Automatically
  -  Turns on when adhesive backing is removed (no buttons)
  -  Recognizes patient attachment
  -  Connects to network
  -  Continuously monitors patient position

Better information. Better care.
Wearable technology can help sustain a high turn adherence.7 And improving protocol adherence can mean better results for your patients.2

   

Leaf has been shown to reduce the incidence of developing a pressure ulcer/injury by 73%.2*

Leaf has been shown to significantly improve turning protocol adherence.8
64% at baseline to 98% after implementation of Leaf (p<0.01)8





 
*For detailed product information, including indications for use, ingredients, directions, contraindications, precautions, warnings,  and/or important safety information, please consult each product’s package labeling, Instructions for Use (IFU), and/or Drug Facts prior to use.


Start a free trial now.

See the difference Leaf can make with a free trial period. Contact us and we’ll take care of the rest.


References
1. Parker C, O’Neill M, Tam N. Strive towards CALNOC excellence: Adopting innovation to improve bedside nursing care (poster). Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA.
2. Pickham, D. Pragmatic RCT evaluating optimal patient turning. Lecture presented at: Symposium on Advanced Wound Care Conference; April 8, 2017; San Diego, CA.
3. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Transforming Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the ICU with Patient Wearable Technology and Nursing Leadership, Texas organization for Nurse executives 2016 (Poster).
4. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance. Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Quick Reference Guide. Haesler E, ed. Osborne Park, Australia. Cambridge Media; 2014.
5. Bergquist-Beringer S, Dong L, He J, Dunton N. Pressure Ulcers and prevention among acute care hospitals in the United States. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2013;39(9): 404-14.
6. Berlowitz D, et al. for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Hospitals: A Toolkit for Improving Quality of Care. https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/publications/files/putoolkit.pdf. Last reviewed October 2015. Accessed August 31, 2017.
7. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Reducing Pressure Injuries in Critical Care Using Wearable Sensor Technology (Poster).
8. Schutt SC, Tarver C, Pezzani M. Innovative technology promotes patient centered care while improving compliance with patient turning protocols. J Adv Nurs. In Press
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Preventing pressure ulcers in hospitals: a toolkit for improving quality of care. https:// www.ahrq.gov/professionals/systems/hospital/pressureulcertoolkit/putool1.html. Updated October 2014. Accessed August 30, 2017. 10. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Hospital-Acquired Conditions. https://www.cms.gov/medicare/medicare-fee-for-service-payment/hospitalacqcond/hospital-acquired_conditions.html. Updated August 19, 2015. Accessed August 21, 2017.
11. Sen CK,  et al. Human skin wounds: a major and snowballing threat to public health and the economy. Wound Repair Regen. 2009;17(6):763-71.
12. Russo CA, Steiner C, Spector W. Hospitalizations Related to Pressure Ulcers among Adults 18 Years and Older, 2006. HCUP Statistical Brief #64. December 2008. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD.
13. Reddy M, et al. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review. JAMA. 2006;296(8):974-84.
14. Lyder CH, et al. Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers: Results from the National Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012;60(9):1603-8.
15. The Financial Impact of Pressure Ulcers (white paper). 2017, Leaf Healthcare, Inc. Pleasanton, CA.

Impact

It’s serious pressure

HAPU/HAPIs can lead to significant patient discomfort and may leave your facility having to pay for treatment that is no longer reimbursed by CMS.9,10 The numbers show pressure ulcers/injuries are having a major effect on patients and facilities in the USA.

pressure ulcer/injuries11 annually12
   
average cost of a Grade 4
HAPU/HAPI13
additional days on average14

Patients with pressure ulcers/injuries represent potential financial and quality improvement risks.10,14,16

Medicare penalties Readmission Litigation


Start a free trial now.

See the difference Leaf can make with a free trial period. Contact us and we’ll take care of the rest. 


References
1. Parker C, O’Neill M, Tam N. Strive towards CALNOC excellence: Adopting innovation to improve bedside nursing care (poster). Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA.
2. Pickham, D. Pragmatic RCT evaluating optimal patient turning. Lecture presented at: Symposium on Advanced Wound Care Conference; April 8, 2017; San Diego, CA.
3. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Transforming Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the ICU with Patient Wearable Technology and Nursing Leadership, Texas organization for Nurse executives 2016 (Poster).
4. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance. Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Quick Reference Guide. Haesler E, ed. Osborne Park, Australia. Cambridge Media; 2014.
5. Bergquist-Beringer S, Dong L, He J, Dunton N. Pressure Ulcers and prevention among acute care hospitals in the United States. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2013;39(9): 404-14.
6. Berlowitz D, et al. for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Hospitals: A Toolkit for Improving Quality of Care. https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/publications/files/putoolkit.pdf. Last reviewed October 2015. Accessed August 31, 2017.
7. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Reducing Pressure Injuries in Critical Care Using Wearable Sensor Technology (Poster).
8. Schutt SC, Tarver C, Pezzani M. Innovative technology promotes patient centered care while improving compliance with patient turning protocols. J Adv Nurs. In Press
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Preventing pressure ulcers in hospitals: a toolkit for improving quality of care. https:// www.ahrq.gov/professionals/systems/hospital/pressureulcertoolkit/putool1.html. Updated October 2014. Accessed August 30, 2017. 10. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Hospital-Acquired Conditions. https://www.cms.gov/medicare/medicare-fee-for-service-payment/hospitalacqcond/hospital-acquired_conditions.html. Updated August 19, 2015. Accessed August 21, 2017.
11. Sen CK,  et al. Human skin wounds: a major and snowballing threat to public health and the economy. Wound Repair Regen. 2009;17(6):763-71.
12. Russo CA, Steiner C, Spector W. Hospitalizations Related to Pressure Ulcers among Adults 18 Years and Older, 2006. HCUP Statistical Brief #64. December 2008. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD.
13. Reddy M, et al. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review. JAMA. 2006;296(8):974-84.
14. Lyder CH, et al. Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers: Results from the National Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012;60(9):1603-8.
16. The Financial Impact of Pressure Ulcers (white paper). 2017, Leaf Healthcare, Inc. Pleasanton, CA.

Prevention

Comprehensive pressure ulcer/injury prevention

National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) guidelines make many recommendations to reduce the impact of pressure ulcers/injuries, including the three important components for an effective prevention program (repositioning, prophylactic dressings and preventive skin care).4

Our solutions

Smith & Nephew offers a portfolio of products that may help in your efforts to implement NPUAP guidelines.



Clinical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers/injuries include three important components as part of a comprehensive prevention program.4 These guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for practice that includes a skin and pressure ulcer/injury risk assessment on admission, regular reassessment of pressure ulcer/injury risk, as well as interventions to minimize patient risk such as regular skin assessment, support surface use, routine repositioning, nutritional support, skin moisture management and the use of prophylactic foam dressings to protect skin over bony prominences.4


Routine repositioning has been shown to be strongly correlated with HAPU/HAPI reductions (OR=0.85, CI=0.81 to 0.90).5

Start a free trial now.

See the difference Leaf can make with a free trial period. Contact us and we’ll take care of the rest. 

 

References
1. Parker C, O’Neill M, Tam N. Strive towards CALNOC excellence: Adopting innovation to improve bedside nursing care (poster). Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA.
2. Pickham, D. Pragmatic RCT evaluating optimal patient turning. Lecture presented at: Symposium on Advanced Wound Care Conference; April 8, 2017; San Diego, CA.
3. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Transforming Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the ICU with Patient Wearable Technology and Nursing Leadership, Texas organization for Nurse executives 2016 (Poster).
4. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance. Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Quick Reference Guide. Haesler E, ed. Osborne Park, Australia. Cambridge Media; 2014.
5. Bergquist-Beringer S, Dong L, He J, Dunton N. Pressure Ulcers and prevention among acute care hospitals in the United States. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2013;39(9): 404-14.
6. Berlowitz D, et al. for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Hospitals: A Toolkit for Improving Quality of Care. https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/publications/files/putoolkit.pdf. Last reviewed October 2015. Accessed August 31, 2017.
7. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Reducing Pressure Injuries in Critical Care Using Wearable Sensor Technology (Poster).
8. Schutt SC, Tarver C, Pezzani M. Innovative technology promotes patient centered care while improving compliance with patient turning protocols. J Adv Nurs. In Press
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Preventing pressure ulcers in hospitals: a toolkit for improving quality of care. https:// www.ahrq.gov/professionals/systems/hospital/pressureulcertoolkit/putool1.html. Updated October 2014. Accessed August 30, 2017. 10. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Hospital-Acquired Conditions. https://www.cms.gov/medicare/medicare-fee-for-service-payment/hospitalacqcond/hospital-acquired_conditions.html. Updated August 19, 2015. Accessed August 21, 2017.
11. Sen CK,  et al. Human skin wounds: a major and snowballing threat to public health and the economy. Wound Repair Regen. 2009;17(6):763-71.
12. Russo CA, Steiner C, Spector W. Hospitalizations Related to Pressure Ulcers among Adults 18 Years and Older, 2006. HCUP Statistical Brief #64. December 2008. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD.
13. Reddy M, et al. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review. JAMA. 2006;296(8):974-84.
14. Lyder CH, et al. Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers: Results from the National Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012;60(9):1603-8.
15. The Financial Impact of Pressure Ulcers (white paper). 2017, Leaf Healthcare, Inc. Pleasanton, CA.

Getting started

How it works

The Leaf Patient Monitoring System was designed specifically to streamline your duties and make stays easier for your patients. Smith & Nephew provides setup, support and training to help make it easy to implement.

 An intuitive design

 

A digital timer shows the time remaining until a turn is required, according to each patient’s prescribed turning protocol. A simple color bar indicates each patient’s mobility status at a glance.
• Green indicates turn alert is greater than 15 minutes away
• Yellow indicates that a turn is due less than 15 minutes away
• Red indicates a turn is past due*

*The Leaf System is not to be used to alert staff of situations that would require immediate action in order to maintain patient safety. Be aware that there is a possibility of ambulation/step detection inaccuracy. Some patient steps may not produce enough movement to be detected by the system. Conversely, some patient movement may resemble the movement associated with taking a step and therefore be recognized by the system as such.

 

Monitors and records patent position, and notifies staff when interventions are needed to achieve high-adherence turn protocols.

A valuable resource

The daily report shows information for the last 24 hours of adherence with repositioning protocols and a 30-day scorecard.

Start a free trial now.

See the difference Leaf can make with a free trial period. Contact us and we’ll take care of the rest. 

For detailed product information, including indications for use, ingredients, directions, contraindications, precautions, warnings and/or important safety information, please consult each product’s package labeling, Instructions for Use (IFU) and/or Drug Facts prior to use.

 

References
1. Parker C, O’Neill M, Tam N. Strive towards CALNOC excellence: Adopting innovation to improve bedside nursing care (poster). Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA.
2. Pickham, D. Pragmatic RCT evaluating optimal patient turning. Lecture presented at: Symposium on Advanced Wound Care Conference; April 8, 2017; San Diego, CA.
3. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Transforming Pressure Ulcer Prevention in the ICU with Patient Wearable Technology and Nursing Leadership, Texas organization for Nurse executives 2016 (Poster).
4. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance. Prevention and Treatment of Pressure Ulcers: Quick Reference Guide. Haesler E, ed. Osborne Park, Australia. Cambridge Media; 2014.
5. Bergquist-Beringer S, Dong L, He J, Dunton N. Pressure Ulcers and prevention among acute care hospitals in the United States. Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf. 2013;39(9): 404-14.
6. Berlowitz D, et al. for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Hospitals: A Toolkit for Improving Quality of Care. https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/publications/files/putoolkit.pdf. Last reviewed October 2015. Accessed August 31, 2017.
7. Walters et al, John Peter Smith Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas. Reducing Pressure Injuries in Critical Care Using Wearable Sensor Technology (Poster).
8. Schutt SC, Tarver C, Pezzani M. Innovative technology promotes patient centered care while improving compliance with patient turning protocols. J Adv Nurs. In Press
9. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Preventing pressure ulcers in hospitals: a toolkit for improving quality of care. https:// www.ahrq.gov/professionals/systems/hospital/pressureulcertoolkit/putool1.html. Updated October 2014. Accessed August 30, 2017. 10. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Hospital-Acquired Conditions. https://www.cms.gov/medicare/medicare-fee-for-service-payment/hospitalacqcond/hospital-acquired_conditions.html. Updated August 19, 2015. Accessed August 21, 2017.
11. Sen CK,  et al. Human skin wounds: a major and snowballing threat to public health and the economy. Wound Repair Regen. 2009;17(6):763-71.
12. Russo CA, Steiner C, Spector W. Hospitalizations Related to Pressure Ulcers among Adults 18 Years and Older, 2006. HCUP Statistical Brief #64. December 2008. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD.
13. Reddy M, et al. Preventing Pressure Ulcers: A Systematic Review. JAMA. 2006;296(8):974-84.
14. Lyder CH, et al. Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcers: Results from the National Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012;60(9):1603-8.
15. The Financial Impact of Pressure Ulcers (white paper). 2017, Leaf Healthcare, Inc. Pleasanton, CA.

Free trial

Start a free trial now.

See the difference Leaf can make with a free trial period. Contact us and we’ll take care of the rest. 

For detailed product information, including indications for use, ingredients, directions, contraindications, precautions, warnings and/or important safety information, please consult each product’s package labeling, Instructions for Use (IFU) and/or Drug Facts prior to use

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