Global

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Obs and Gynae

0% readmissions in patient receiving treatment with PICO™ incision management system.

Effective Intervention

PICO devicePICO™ is a revolutionary single use, canister free NPWT system.

On a closed incision such as a C-section, the PICO system holds the edges of the incision together1,2, and is a proven effective intervention to reduce the risk of infection3 and other complications such as haematoma. 4,5
In a recent study, PICO was used on patients who were deemed to be high risk (high BMI) to reduce infections following C-section surgery.  The hospital during this time experienced no readmissions for these high risk patients and a 50% reduction in SSI rates post-surgery within the same group.  Data was collated through post-discharge surveillance with patients monitored for 30 days post operatively. 3
Having performed a skilled procedure, every surgeon wants to protect their patient from post C-section complications.  PICO makes it possible.
 

References

1. Hudson D, Adams K, Huyssteen A, Martin M & Huddleston E. (2013). Simplified negative pressure wound therapy: clinical evaluation of an ultraportable, no-canister system.
2. Leak K. A case series appraisal of a single use NPWT system in secondary care.  Poster presented at Wounds UK, Harrogate, 2011.
3. Bullough L, Wilkinson D. Changing wound care protocols to reduce post-operative Caesarean section complications. (Presented at Wounds UK Annual Conference, Harrogate 2012).
4. Pellino G et al. (2013). Effects of a new pocket device for negative pressure wound therapy on surgical wounds of patients affected with Crohn's disease: a pilot trial.
5. Canonico S et al. (2012). Therapeutic possibilities of portable NPWT. Initial multidisciplinary observation with the negative pressure therapy device.

C-section complications

There is increasing pressure on the health system as a result of more complex pregnancies presenting to maternity units.
An increasing number of obese patients, multiple births and older mums, as well as those with chronic diseases such as diabetes increases the risk of complications, contributing to the growing need for caesarean section.

In the UK between 25-30% of births are via C-section which is above the WHO recommended rate of 15%.1

  • 1 in 10 women undergoing a C-section experience an SSI2
  • 1 in 7 women with diabetes undergoing a C-section experiences an SSI2
  • 1 in 5 with a BMI>35 experience an SSI2

Reducing SSIs is a priority for all surgeons and healthcare systems.

For new mothers, the  impact of SSIs on their wellbeing  at this important time in their lives can be devastating.3

PICO™ incision management system provides a high quality intervention to protect the surgical site.  This innovative technology has been shown to be associated  with high levels of patient satisfaction.4

Michelle Mann, a mother of three and a PICO patient describes her experience:

    "I had an emergency C-section and was a bit nervous about my recovery since I had had an infection with my first C-section. For me, PICO was as easy as wearing a belt. It didn't restrict my movements at all and it was easy to remove for showering. I didn't have an infection after this surgery and overall my recovery was much better the second time around."  

 

References

1. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2013). RCOG statement on emergency Caesarean Section rates.
2. Wloch C, Wilson J, Lamagni T, Harrington P, Charlett A, Sheridan E. Risk factors for surgical site infection following caesarean section in England: results from a multicentre cohort study. BJOG 2012
3. Harris J et al. Using a Multi-Faceted Active Change Process and Infection Prevention to Reduce Post Op C-Section Infections. Presented at the 27th Annual Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care (Las Vegas, 20-23 October 2013). 
4. Hurd T et al. Evaluation of the impact of restructuring wound management practices in a community care provider in Niagara, Canada. International Wound Journal 2008 5, 2, 296–304. 

The financial cost

With an increasing number of C-sections being performed on an ever more complex patient group, managing SSIs is becoming more costly at a time when healthcare budgets are tighter and quality of care is closely scrutinised.
 

Increased length of stay, intensive management of complications, and associated re-admissions all add significant cost to a healthcare system.1-4,6


The cost to the patient is even higher – the impact of SSIs on the wellbeing of new mothers at this important time in their lives can be devastating.4

The use of PICO to reduce surgical site complications following C-section surgery has the potential to lead to improved outcomes whilst lowering the costs associated with post-operative management.5

In a recent study, PICO was used on patients who were deemed to be high risk (high BMI) to reduce infections following C-section surgery.  The hospital during this time experienced no readmissions for these high risk patients and a 50% reduction in SSI rates post-surgery within the same group.  Data was collated through post-discharge surveillance with patients monitored for 30 days post operatively.5

 

References

1. Health Protection Agency (2012) Risk of infection from caesareans at nearly 10 percent, http://www.hpa.org.uk/NewsCentre/NationalPressReleases/2012PressReleases/120801Infectionriskfromcsection/ accessed October 2012.
2. Hurd T. Evaluating the Costs and Benefits of Innovations in Chronic Wound Care Products and Practices. June 2013, Ostomy Wound Management 1-15.
3. Wloch C, Wilson J, Lamagni T, Harrington P, Charlett A, Sheridan E. Risk factors for surgical site infection following caesarean section in England: results   from a multicentre cohort study. BJOG 2012; 119(11):1324-33.
4. Harris J et al. Using a Multi-Faceted Active Change Process and Infection Prevention to Reduce Post Op C-Section Infections. Presented at the 27th Annual Clinical Symposium on Advances in Skin & Wound Care (Las Vegas, 20-23 October 2013). 
5. Bullough L, Wilkinson D. Changing wound care protocols to reduce post-operative Caesarean section complications. (Presented at Wounds UK Annual   Conference, Harrogate 2012). 
6. Perencevich EN, Sands KE, Cosgrove SE, Guadagnoli E, Meara E, Platt R. Health and economic impact of surgical site infections diagnosed after hospital discharge. Emerg Infect Dis 2003;9(2):196-203.